amwriting

Bill O’Reilly’s Dog

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The dog experienced the same fate as Bill O’Reilly: he didn’t know who he was anymore: he had seen himself in the mirror and discovered he was, in fact, a dog.

He was not the protector of the house: he was just like that thing across the street he’d been yelling about.

All of these years he had been yelling about himself.

Instead of guarding the windows against threats to the house, he was the threat: where O’Reilly broke into tears during his infamous segment on Islamophobia- giving his revelation that his promotion of fear had resulted in more murder- Bones fell apart after an introduction to his twin brother, when they barked in unison at the same white dog, carried by a confused owner, and, like O’Reilly, he fell to the ground whimpering, peeing himself on the floor, destroyed and yet on the cusp of a new aggression, an informed aggression, an aggression pointed against the owners who had trained him to fight, and from whose fragile situation of masculinity had chosen to name him Bones.

If the dog in the window is a distraction, what is going on inside?

word by Liam Lachance

From the author: “Because media has socialized citizens to kill each other, the onus is on the anchors and especially on their bosses – who chose them to disseminate information, and who choose what they will say. Stories have the power to bring us together. Using stories to divide communities fails the art form and is morally indefensible.”

colour by Fintan Magee

Born in Lismore NSW, Fintan Magee moved to Brisbane as a child and began drawing shortly after. In his early teens he was exposed to Brisbane’s graffiti culture and began painting on walls.

Moving away from traditional graffiti in recent years, his large-scale murals often inhabit the isolated, abandoned and broken corners of the city. Mixing surreal and figurative imagery his paintings are deeply integrated with the urban environment and explore themes of waste, consumption, loss and transition and contain a sentimentality and softness influenced by children’s books.

He has traveled extensively completing projects in Sydney, Melbourne, London, Vienna, Los Angeles, Miami, Atlanta, Bogota, Buenos Aires, Copenhagen, Moscow, New York, Oslo and Dublin amongst others. His diligence, technical skill and progressive approach to painting have solidified his reputation as one of the leading figures in Australia’s Street Art and Contemporary Mural movements.

 

 

 

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